Character Interview

Thank you for doing this.  You appear very loyal, willing to threaten your job as a nanny to defend your friend who is accused of murder. You live in an exciting time because society is changing and it appears your hopes are changing as well. 

 

Elise Cooper: Why did you decide to become a nanny of sorts?

Louisa Cannon: I needed to get away from London and my friend Jennie was with Miss Nancy when I bumped into her just before Christmas 1919. Miss Nancy mentioned that the nursery maid had left and they were in need of another, what with Lady Redesdale expecting another baby at the time. I thought it couldn’t be too hard to pick up what to do, and I’m good enough at sewing too, because of helping my mother with laundry and mending the linens for the big houses. 

 

EC: Now that many of the girls are older you have morphed into a chaperone-what is that like?

LC: Nanny Blor looks after the littlest ones, and I think because Miss Nancy and Miss Pamela and I are not too far apart in age, it was more natural for it to be me going with them to London. Although I know London, I don’t know it the way they know it. I’d never have seen the insides of some of the houses they go to, let alone the parties and the nightclubs. Sitting with Miss Nancy or Miss Pamela I hear all kinds of conversations that the likes of me would never be party to usually. 

 

EC: You have become an amateur sleuth-why?

LC: I didn’t mean to! But Mr. Sullivan became a friend of mine, when he was working for the railway police – he’s a sergeant with the Metropolitan Police now – got me interested. Nanny Blor’s sister knew the nurse who was murdered on the train, and that got everyone involved somehow. I didn’t really want to get caught up in it all but somehow it happened, and knowing Miss Nancy and hearing what the police were investigating. it meant I was the one who could put the pieces together I think. 

 

EC: Alice Diamond is a larger than life criminal-are you afraid of her?

LC: Yes, but not because I thought she would be violent. It was more that she was the most powerful woman I’d ever seen. I didn’t know a woman could command attention in a room like she could. And she does whatever she wants. I’m not saying those are necessarily good things and she’s a thief – that’s bad, of course. But there’s something amazing about seeing a woman know what she wants and go after it, with no man stopping her.

 

EC: Do you ever wish that you can trade places with the “Bright Young Things,” those you work for, and become part of the rich and famous?

LC: I don’t think that I want be rich and famous, I want to be myself. But I don’t see why I shouldn’t be myself and have a little of what they have sometimes. I do like those beautiful dresses. It’s all just pretend in a way, like putting wallpaper up. What you look like on the outside – does that mean that’s what you are on the inside? I don’t know. I feel sometimes like what I wear betrays me and that if someone could really see me, they’d see me in something different. But I am who I am, I can’t change that and I don’t know that I really want to. 

 

EC: How would you describe your relationship with Guy?

LC: Oh. That’s hard to do. I like Guy, I like him a lot. We’ve been friends for some years now and I know he has been sweet on me in the past. It’s just complicated because I want to work, and if I marry, I have to quit my job. But for Guy, life could go on just the same as before, only he’d have a wife instead of his mother doing his washing and cooking his meals. It’s an exciting time for women right now – 1925! We can go out to work and earn our own money, and not have a father or husband telling us what to do. I want some of that. 

 

EC: Since this is 1925 are you a supporter of women’s suffrage?

LC: Yes, of course. We’ve got the vote now – well, sort of, if you’re over 30 years old and a house owner. But it’s better than the nothing we had before. I believe in women’s rights. There aren’t enough men around since the war and women have to be able to go out to work to support themselves. 

 

EC: Do you think he is unusual in that he treats women as equals-considering his police partner is a woman?

LC: Yes, I think Guy is unusual, which is why I like him and why it gets complicated between us. He does show real respect for women, and he listens. Not many men do that. Though I don’t know that he’s very interested in trying to change the world, he’s quite happy to keep the status quo, I think. So he’ll be good to women but I don’t think he wants them in charge or anything like that. What man does? 

 

EC: Is it more fun to be around Nancy or Pamela?

LC: They’re both very different. Miss Nancy is quite sharp, you have to be careful not to be on the wrong end of her. But she can also be very funny, and a lot of fun. She’s the most daring, the most willing to try something new. If it wasn’t for Miss Nancy I wouldn’t have had the courage to go to the 43 nightclub, and I’m grateful to her for that. Miss Pamela is quieter but she’s steady and kind. The others rely on her to be their rock. If you were in trouble, Miss Pamela’s the one you’d want on your side. 

 

EC: What do you like doing for fun?

LC: I don’t get much time for fun but I like reading – Lady Redesdale tells me books to read for history and she is kind enough to let me borrow from their library. Otherwise, I go for long walks with the littlest girls – Debo and Decca – and I love learning more about the flowers that grow in the country. I grew up in London and didn’t see much more than the odd patch of grass and oak trees. Out here in the country you can see for miles and miles, nothing but fields and hedgerows and birds soaring in the skies. It makes me feel free. 

 

EC: What are your hopes and dreams?

LC: I don’t know that I dare think beyond next week. But I suppose it would be nice to think that I might be a woman of some significance somehow, one day. That seems a bit silly, I know. I had to leave school at fourteen and I don’t know any science. I’m not sure what work I might be able to do but I’m always looking about, you read about things in the newspapers that would have seemed impossible only a few years ago. 

 

THANK YOU!!

An interview with Kate Burkholder from Linda Castillo’s A Gathering of Secrets

 

For those who do not know Kate Burkholder she helped to break the glass ceiling by becoming Chief of Police in a small town whose community consists of Amish and “Englishers.” Some cases she has to solve are more personal than others.  Chief Burkholder has had to deal with her own Amish MeToo Moment, but also wonders if many of the Amish girls have a similar experience.  Kate has spoken many times of her struggles with this peaceful and deeply religious community that at times appears to be conspiring to hide a truth no one wants to talk about. Kate has agreed to open up about her personal and professional experiences.

  

Elise Cooper: Having left the Amish community are there any parts of you that you consider were influenced by your Amish upbringing?

Kate Burkholder: Every part of me was influenced by my Amish upbringing.  Good or bad or somewhere in between, I think that’s true for most of us.  The Amish influence on my life was mostly positive.  I was raised in a very traditional family with a lot of rules (some of which I didn’t follow) and structure.  I was close to my siblings.  As kids, we worked hard, but we played just as hard.  My father was the disciplinarian.  I was close to my mother.  Everything changed in the summer of my fourteenth year, and I never saw my family—or the Amish community—in quite the same light.

 

EC: What do you most miss most and miss the least about the Amish?  

KB: What I miss most about being Amish is the sense of belonging, of being part of such a close-knit community.  I also miss the closeness I once had with my family.  That said, there are a couple of things about being Amish I didn’t like and ultimately couldn’t live with.  One is that it tends to be a patriarchal society (not always, but generally speaking.)  And one of the Amish tenets is to be compliant and accepting.  I couldn’t always abide.  Even when it came to something as final as death, I would not readily accept it and I would rail against the unfairness of it.  The Amish are also pacifists.  I am not. 

 

EC: Do you ever want the approval of the Amish community or your Amish Family?  

KB: That need for approval is important to a young Amish person growing up.  Your family and the Amish community are the center of your universe.  But I do still find myself craving the approval of my brother, Jacob, and my sister, Sarah.  And then there’s Bishop Troyer, one of the elders who has been a fixture in my life for as long as I can remember.

 

EC: Do you think having been Amish helps or hurts you as police chief?  

KB: Being born and raised Amish in the town of Painters Mill (where one third of the population is Amish) has definitely made me a better and more effective police chief.  I understand the culture, the religion, and I also speak Deitsh, the language.  All of those things have gone a long way toward bridging the gap that exists between the Amish community and the “English” government.

 

 

EC: One of those you interviewed, Milo Hershberger, is under the bann.  Can you tell us what that’s like for an Amish person?

KB: The bann is the Amish practice of social avoidance.  Basically, when an Amish person breaks the rules set forth by the church district, that person is called out and excluded from the entire community, including his or her family members.  No one will speak with them or associate with them or even takes meals with them.  What many non-Amish people don’t realize is that the practice is intended to be redemptive.  A way to bring the person back into the fold.  With the family and community being the nucleus of an Amish person’s life, taking away those associations can be devastating.  Most often, if an Amish person wants to get back in the good graces of the community, all he or she must do is confess their sins and follow the rules.  Some of the Old Order practice excommunication, which, depending on the offense, can be permanent.

 

EC: Because the Amish are somewhat a “closed society” and keep to themselves, are crimes more difficult to solve?  

KB: Sometimes an investigation is much more difficult if it involves the Amish, mainly because of the “tenet of separation” many of the Amish practice.  They try to remain separate from the rest of the world.  Sometimes they try to protect their own.  The reluctance of some Amish to come forward makes information hard to come by.  In the course of any case, information is the most important commodity.

 

EC:  You once told me about the Amish rule of forgiveness. 

KB:  An Amish boy who does something terribly wrong, even raping someone, can get off.  If he confesses before the Church congregation, he is forgiven.  This is why many of the girls do not speak up, some committing suicide, because they knew the boy would have been forgiven and they would be caught up in the stigma.  

 

EC: Are you content with your life?

KB: I’ve come a long way since the first major case I worked as chief of police in Painters Mill.  I attribute that mostly to my relationship—and love—for BCI agent John Tomasetti.  My love for my small department of officers play a role, too.  They are my family when my own aren’t there for me.  I would be remiss not to mention my love for the community as a whole—both Amish and “English”—all of those souls who call Painters Mill home.

 

EC: Through the years what has made you stronger? 

KB: You’ve heard the axiom: What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.  That’s the way life works and I’m a stronger and a more centered person because of the curve balls life has thrown my way, some in the form of difficult cases and various investigations.  On a more personal level, I’ve worked through the trials and tribulations of being formerly Amish and a female chief of police in a small town.  All of that combined has made me a stronger person.

 

THANK YOU!

Latest comments

30.03 | 21:07

📚🌻📚🌻❤️... GREAT REVIEW

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24.12 | 00:28

Always look forward to your weekly blog, Marti ... safe travels this week. Merry Christmas!

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01.10 | 16:20

Happy Birthday! I remember when book club started when you turned 50. OMG! 100% agree with political status. So disappointing. Happy Foliage!

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27.05 | 23:23

Outraged, too! It is just getting coverage. This government is shameful under this leadership.

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